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The Art of the Pen: I Love To Write Day

13th Nov, 2015 | Posted by in Blog
The Art of the Pen: I Love To Write Day

You might imagine that I love to write, given that it’s both my hobby and my vocation, and that makes I Love To Write Day one of my favorite holidays of the year. I don’t really need much encouragement to pick up the proverbial pen and start writing something new (I have countless journals filled with my random scribblings to prove this point). My son has followed in my footsteps, and his school is one of the thousands across the nation that have adopted this holiday.

Established in 2002 by a gentleman by the name of John Riddle (no relation to Tom) from Delaware, I Love To Write Day has become an increasingly popular excuse to encourage new and old writers alike to get back to putting down the written word.

Why Should You Love To Write
Literacy was not a guarantee for hundreds of years, over the world those who could read and write by and large outnumbered those who could not. When one stops to consider the sheer amount of wisdom and knowledge that was passed down by the limited number of people who could write, it makes one stop and wonder how much was left unwritten and lost to history by people who had never had the opportunity to learn to put down their thoughts on paper.

I think that the written word cannot possibly be wasted, whether it is the inexpert scribblings of a four year old first learning his letters, or the skilled work of masterful poets and authors. Every word put down for posterity is a testament to the beauty and tragedy of the human spirit, and is beautiful in its own right.

What Should I Do To Celebrate I Love To Write Day?
Put your thoughts down on paper, it doesn’t matter whether you’re writing in a digital journal or scribbling out your thoughts on a genuine board and paper book. The smallest contributions leaves great insights for historians in the future. Some of the most valuable finds in archaeology aren’t great books of knowledge, but are instead personal journals that reveal private, intimate moments about life in the time of the author.

History is often recorded in broad strokes, talking about great events and overarching trends. A personal journal provides something neither of these can, an actual view of life at the everyman level. Additionally journals can become treasured family heirlooms, giving insight into the family member and genealogical tracking that can let them live on in the family mind.

Also, it’s never too late to become a well-known writer. Write because you have the passion to write, the desire to leave your mark on the world. Many writers were never well known until long after their passing, and some who thought they’d never see success turned into the next Rowling.

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