Skip to content

The Filipino-American Friendship Day celebrates the strong ties that have been built between the two nations over many years.

Initially, the Philippines observed its own Independence Day on this date, but it was later moved to June 12 to honor an earlier declaration of independence from Spain.

Filipino-American Friendship Day serves as a reminder of the complex yet strong relationship that has evolved between the two countries, from a tumultuous beginning to a partnership that both nations now value.

Over the years, this day has symbolized the enduring friendship and mutual benefits that have stemmed from this international relationship.

This celebration emphasizes the importance of maintaining good alliances and promotes positive international relations.

Through such observances, both Filipinos and Americans are reminded of their intertwined histories and the mutual respect that has developed, fostering stronger and more cooperative ties between the two countries.

History of ​Filipino-American Friendship Day

Filipino-American Friendship Day has a rich history intertwined with the evolving relations between the United States and the Philippines.

Initially celebrated as Philippine Republic Day, the event commemorated the Philippines’ independence from the U.S.

This date was chosen to coincide with America’s own Independence Day, symbolically marking the end of American colonial rule over the Philippines.

The celebration underwent several changes over the decades. In 1955, President Ramón Magsaysay introduced Philippine-American Day on November 15, marking the inauguration of the Commonwealth.

However, President Ferdinand Marcos moved it back to July 4 in 1984 and renamed it Philippine-American Friendship Day.

This change aimed to emphasize the positive aspects of the bilateral relationship between the two nations, shifting focus from colonial overtones to friendship and cooperation​.

The observance of this day as a non-working holiday was abolished in 1987 under the administration of President Corazón Aquino. It was a period of reevaluation of Philippine national identity and historical milestones.

Despite this, the day continues to be celebrated as Filipino-American Friendship Day, highlighting the long-standing and complex ties between the two countries that have evolved from colonial history to a partnership based on mutual interests and shared democratic values.

How to Celebrate ​Filipino-American Friendship Day

Host a Cultural Exchange Potluck

One can’t think of a better way to celebrate Filipino-American Friendship Day than by hosting a potluck. Invite friends to bring dishes that represent both Filipino and American cuisines.

This fusion feast will not only tantalize taste buds but also spark conversations about the unique flavors of each culture.

Engage in Historical Chats

Why not organize a small gathering where folks can share stories and historical tidbits about Filipino-American relations?

It’s a day to remember the past and look forward to the future, so diving into history with friends or community members can be both enlightening and fun.

Play Filipino and American Games

Mix a bit of competitive spirit into the day by playing popular games from both cultures.

Whether it’s a spirited round of the Filipino game “Sungka” or a friendly match of baseball, games are a fantastic way to bond and learn about each other’s traditions.

Watch Filipino and American Films

A movie marathon can be a blast! Choose films from both Filipino and American filmmakers to appreciate the art and messages that resonate from both sides of the Pacific.

It’s a relaxing way to explore different perspectives and storytelling techniques.

Create Art Together

Nothing says friendship like creating something together. Set up a workshop where participants can make crafts inspired by Filipino and American symbols.

Think mini jeepneys or Statue of Liberty figurines. It’s a creative way to reflect on the day’s significance while making memorable keepsakes.

Also on ...

View all holidays
View all holidays

We think you may also like...

Calendar