Learn about Guide Dogs Day

Guide dogs do a lot for their owners. They protect their owners from harm, help guide them throughout the day, and provide consistent support like no other. Trainers work hard to hone these skills.

These dogs are always seen as a joy that makes the world a better place for their owners. Guide Dog Day aims to help others show appreciation for the hard work they do.

History of Guide Dogs Day

Guide dogs have been around since the 79 AD when paintings of guide dogs being used to help the blind was seen on at the excavations in Pompeii.

Guide dogs were used in various countries throughout the centuries, such as ancient China and medieval Europe. During the 1700s and 1800s, historians and anthropologists encountered more observations of guide dogs through nursery rhymes and stories.

It wasn’t until the mid-1800s that some of the first legislation recognizing guide dogs started to appear. In 1838, when the British Parlament exempts license fees for “shepherds’ dogs and “those kept by the blind as guides.”

The early 1900s began the training of guide dogs for blind people, and in 1934, the Guide Dogs for the Blind Association was established. Those during WWII saw extensive use for these kinds of dogs, specifically for veterans who lost their sight in the midst of war. However, it wasn’t until 2010, when the ADA helped establish legal rules for those with disabilities and in need of guide dogs.

Guide Dogs Day honors the work that these service dogs provide for people everywhere. These dogs have skills ranging from leading a blind person around an area to providing emotional comfort during their service. This is why guide dogs are some of the best service dogs to have.

People celebrate this day by learning how trainers train these dogs and showing support for their trainers. They also support those dogs who haven’t made it through training by adopting them.  

How to celebrate Guide Dogs Day

Want to support guide dogs? Begin by learning what the ADA states about guide dogs and what rules surround them in public areas. Educating yourself about these dogs can help prevent accidents and misunderstandings, especially for those disabled.

Donate money to your local guide dog training organization and if you need a guide dog, adopt one. If you don’t need one but still want a dog to adopt a dog that couldn’t complete their training and give them a new home. Share this holiday with your family members and show your support for these fantastic dogs.

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