Quick Facts

Dates
Every January 20th
Hashtag
#DiscJockeyDay
Tagged as
Jobs & Professions

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We see them in clubs, at parties and even at weddings. They’re always dancing behind their decks, thinking of the next song to play to keep the crowd going. Sometimes you can go up to them and ask for your favorite song, and at other times, they’ll be playing all the classics that you love because they can read the mood like a psychic.

Disc jockeys, or DJs for short, are fairly unappreciated until you realize how difficult it is to pick and mix the right songs to please the crowd. If they get it wrong, they’ll be booed off the stage and go home feeling awful. However, if they manage to please the crowd and get them moving, they’ll be hailed as the hero of the night. Respect needs to be paid to this creative profession, and that’s why disc jockey day exists.

Regardless if you work as a disc jockey or regularly listen to them play in clubs and bars, Disc Jockey Day is a time to celebrate the art of DJing and remember some of the legendary DJs and sets they’ve played over the past few decades.

Back in those days, DJing required a massive selection of vinyl records, spare copies in case they got too scratched up, expensive equipment and a kitted-out venue. Today, anyone can become a disc jockey thanks to the plethora of powerful software available and digital turntables that can play music files from your PC.

History of Disc Jockey Day

The very first disc jockey was actually a live radio experiment. A sixteen-year-old by the name of Ray Newby played a few records over the airwaves, kickstarting a movement that spread from California to the entire world. However, at this time, the word “disc jockey” wasn’t even used. In fact, the term didn’t appear until around 25 years later when radio commentator Walter Winchell started using the term to describe on-air music broadcasters. This was back during a time when records were the primary source of music, not digital files or small CDs like they are today.

One of the most influential disc jockeys was Albert James Freed, also known as Moondog on air. As one of the pioneering disc jockeys, he pushed the medium and even popularized the term “rock ‘n’ roll” to describe an up-and-coming music genre that we’ve all come to love and appreciate today. His influence was so great that Disc Jockey Day was created to celebrate the art of DJing and to remember legendary pioneers such as Freed.

How to celebrate Disc Jockey Day

You can celebrate disc jockey day with the hashtag #DiscJockeyDay on social media. You could also give your thanks to your favorite DJs or even try mixing some tracks of your own. You don’t need expensive gear nowadays and you could even make a little event out of it with your friends and family members. Not only is DJing a lot of fun, but you’ll learn to respect DJs once you realize just how difficult it is to keep the crowd dancing.