Sauerkraut and frankfurters have always been considered to be a German cuisine that’s filling and comforting. However, many don’t realize how integrated the history of these two foods has been throughout people’s lives.

People all over the world come from everywhere to try out these tasty foods, and during Kraut and Frankfurter Week, people get to celebrate and learn about the history of these great foods.

History of Kraut and Frankfurter Week

Sauerkraut, although many believe it to be a German invention, began during the times of Ancient China over 2,000 years ago, made with shredded cabbage fermented in rice wine. A thousand years later is it believed to have been brought over to Europe by Genghis Kahn.

The German and Dutch then incorporated this dish into their lifestyles, using it as a way to prevent scurvy. The frankfurter or a meat sausage usually made with pork, has been around since the middle ages and were named after the city of Frankfurt, Germany.

These sausages were originally served at the Imperial coronation ceremonies at the Römerberg. Both sauerkraut and frankfurters were soon introduced to the United States during the 1800s by Pennsylvania Dutch and German settlers.

During WWII, it is said that due to the concerns made from the product’s German name, Sauerkraut was relabeled as Liberty Cabbage throughout the duration of the war. Although today it’s reverted back to its original name, both frankfurters and sauerkraut have become a stable part of American cuisine.

During the early 1900s, hot-dog stands appeared, selling the sausages as sandwiches in Coney Island, New York, which also contributed towards its associations with picnics, barbeques, and athletic events.

Kraut and Frankfurter Week celebrates the history of these two foods and their delicious combinations in hopes to show how the combinations of cultures can produce tasty dishes for everyone to enjoy.

How to Celebrate Kraut and Frankfurter Week

Take the time to have a backyard barbeque or outdoor picnic and have some hotdogs with sauerkraut! Try your hand at making your own frankfurters and sauerkraut using online recipes or head on over to your local grocery store and purchase your favorite brand.

If you want a more authentic experience, then head on over to your local Amish community or German festival to try some authentic German cuisine. If you live in New York City, head on over to Coney Island to try some famous Nathan’s hotdogs.

Share this holiday on social media using the hashtag #NationalFrankfurterAndKrautWeek and #FrankfurterAndKrautWeek to let your friends and family know it’s a great time to eat delicious food and have a good time.